What Can I Plant in March?

If you’re like me, you’re ready to go outside and get your hands dirty at the very first sign of spring each year. This year, my spring fever set in a little bit earlier than usual, which I am certain is due in part to the passing of a particularly long, snowy, and arduous winter.

Now those icy months spent cooped up inside are finally coming to a close, and it’s time to till some fresh earth! Unless you are fortunate enough to live in a warm climate, however, you may feel the need to proceed with caution. Although buds are beginning to appear, temps remain a bit frosty. Here in Norfolk, Virginia, the weather tends to still be pretty cool this time of year. High temperatures are only in the 40s, and lows hover right around freezing.

The good news is that despite the fact that the chill is not yet gone from the air, there are many types of plants that do well in late winter and early spring. In fact, some crops can be both planted and harvested before hot weather comes around. Here are some types of vegetables that fare well when planted in March:

1. Radishes– Radishes are an excellent option for the gardener who is seeking a bit of instant gratification. After you plant them, they can be ready to harvest in as little as about three weeks! Several different varieties of radishes grow well when planted in the early spring, including Burpee White, Champion, Cherry Belle, Easter Egg, Early Scarlett Globe, Snow Belle, and Plum Purple. Radishes grow well in almost any soil that is prepared properly, is fertilized before planting, and has adequate moisture. Sow your radish seeds in soil that is 1/4 to 1/2 inch deep.

2. Spinach- Spinach is another plant that grows well from seeds during this time of year. The results are not quite as quick as radishes, but still speedy, as spinach will be ready to pick and eat in about 48 days. Olympia and Bloomsdale varieties tend to be the most popular for spring planting. Plant your spinach seeds in rows, and space them about 1/2 to 1 inch apart. Cover them very lightly with just about 1/2 inch of soil. Make sure to water them because spinach loves moist soil. Don’t water them too heavily, however, as this can wash the seeds out or cause them to sink too low into the soil.

3. Lettuce- With fresh spinach and fresh lettuce, you’ll have the makings for a delicious springtime salad! Sow your lettuce seeds in a thin layer of just about 1/2 inch of soil. Leave a good 10-12 inches of soil between your rows. So that not all of your lettuce is mature at the same time, you may wish to stagger your rows by several days. This way, you can have successive rows of fresh lettuce for several weeks, rather than harvesting it all in one weekend. Depending on the type of lettuce you plant, it will be ready to harvest within about 6 to 14 weeks.

4. Carrots- Carrots are best planted after the final frost, so you may wish to wait until the end of March to plant your carrots. (Now mind you, you can always start your seeds indoors or under glass, but so far we’ve been discussing only direct outdoor seeding.) Carrots will be ready for harvest in about 80 days.

5. Peas- Peas are a real springtime champ. In fact, of there’s just one vegetable that you decide to sow in March this year, I’d say make it peas. They are tolerant of the cool temperatures and light frosts that still occur at this time. Early plantings also usually produce a larger yield. Your peas should be planted in single rows with about 1 inch of soil cover, and will be ready for harvest in about 60 days.

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3 comments so far

  1. […] back in early spring when we discussed vegetables that can be planted in March? Well, the first one that I had listed was radishes. I often refer to these as the gardener’s […]

  2. […] would be remiss if I did not include oni0ns on my list of vegetables that may be planted in March. Really, when it comes to vegetables, is there anything quite as versatile as the onion? My wife […]

  3. […] I just love the month of March. Daylight savings is coming up and the days are getting longer, the frigid weather is beginning to melt away, and the trees are starting to bud. March is also the official start to the spring planting season in many hardiness zones, including here in zone 7b. There are many types of fruits, vegetables and flowers that can be direct sown in March. My favorites are listed here in my blog from last year, What Can I Plant In March? […]


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